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Egyptian god ancient Egyptian god goddess
Osiris Pharaoh Ptah Qebehsenuf Qetesh Ra Ra-Horakhty Sati
 

 
All The Gods Egyptian
 

 
Name God Of.. Name God Of..
Amen   Amen-Ra  
Amset protector of the liver Anubis preserve all the dead
Anuket dispenser of cool water Apis deity of fertility
Aten the sun Atum  
Bast   Bes entertainer of children
Duamutef protector of the stomach Edjo  
Geb the earth Hadit  
Hapi protector of the lungs Hathor goddess of the dead
Harpocrates   Heqet  
Heru-ra-ha   Horus  
Horus of Behedet   Imhotep  
Isis   Khepri  
Khnum   Khons  
Maat   Min  
Month   Mut  
Nefertum   Neith  
Nekhbet   Nephthys  
Nut   Osiris  
Pharaoh   Ptah  
Qebehsenuf   Qetesh  
Ra   Ra-Horakhty  
Sati   Seker  
Sekhmet   Selket  
Serapis   Set  
Shu   Sobek  
Sothis   Tefnut  
Thoth   Thoueris  


Osiris (Ausar)
The god of the dead, and the god of the resurrection into eternal life; ruler, protector, and judge of the deceased, and his prototype (the deceased was in historical times usually referred to as "the Osiris"). His cult originated in Abydos, where his actual tomb was said to be located.
Osiris was the first child of Nut and Geb, thus the brother of Set, Nephthys, and Isis, who was also his wife. By Isis he fathered Horus, and according to some stories, Nephthys assumed the form of Isis, seduced him thus, and from their union was born Anubis.

Osiris ruled the world of men in the beginning, after Ra had abandoned the world to rule the skies, but he was murdered by his brother Set. Through the magic of Isis, he was made to live again. Being the first living thing to die, he subsequently became lord of the dead. His death was avenged by his son Horus, who defeated Set and cast him out into the desert to the West of Egypt (the Sahara).

Prayers and spells were addressed to Osiris throughout Egyptian history, in hopes of securing his blessing and entering the afterlife which he ruled; but his popularity steadily increased through the Middle Kingdom. By Dynasty XVIII he was probably the most widely worshipped god in Egypt. His popularity endured until the latest phases of Egyptian history; reliefs still exist of Roman emperors, conquerors of Egypt, dressed in the traditional garb of the Pharaohs, making offerings to him in the temples.

See also Anubis, Horus, Isis, Nephthys, Set.
Pharaoh (deified kings)
From earliest times in Egypt the pharaohs were worshipped as gods: the son of Ra, the son of Horus, the son of Amen, etc. depending upon what period of Egyptian history and what part of the country is being considered. It should be noted that prayers, sacrifices, etc. to the pharaohs were extremely rare, if they occured at all - there seems to be little or no evidence to support an actual cult of the pharaoh. The pharaoh was looked upon as being chosen by and favored by the gods, his fathers.
Ptah
Worshipped in Memphis from the earliest dynastic times (c.3100 BC), Ptah was seen as the creator of the universe in the Memphite cosmology. He fashioned the bodies in which dwelt the souls of men in the afterlife. Other versions of the myths state that he worked under Thoth's orders, creating the heavens and the earth according to Thoth's specifications.
Ptah is depicted as a bearded man wearing a skullcap, shrouded much like a mummy, with his hands emerging from the wrappings in front and holding the Uas (phoenix-headed) scepter, an Ankh, and a Djed (sign of stability). He was often worshipped in conjunction with the gods Seker and Osiris, and worshipped under the name Ptah-seker-ausar.

He was said to be the husband of Sekhmet and the father of Nefertum (and later Imhotep).
Qebehsenuf (Kabexnuf, Qebsneuef)
One of the Four Sons of Horus, Qebhsenuef was represented as a mummified man with the head of a falcon. He was the protector of the intestines of the deceased, and was protected by the goddess Selket.
See also Four Sons of Horus, Selket.
Qetesh
Originally believed to be a Syrian deity, Qetesh was a goddess of love and beauty. Qetesh was depicted as a beautiful nude woman, standing or riding upon a lion, holding flowers, a mirror, or serpents. She is generally shown full-face (unusual in Egyptian artistic convention). She was also considered the consort of the god Min, the god of virility.
See also Min.
Ra
Ra was the god of the sun during dynastic Egypt; the name is thought to have meant "creative power", and as a proper name "Creator", similar to English Christian usage of the term "Creator" to signify the "almighty God." Very early in Egyptian history Ra was identified with Horus, who as a hawk or falon-god represented the loftiness of the skies. Ra is represented either as a hawk-headed man or as a hawk. In order to travel through the waters of Heaven and the Underworld, Ra was depicted as traveling in a boat.
During dynastic Egypt Ra's cult center was Annu (Hebrew "On", Greek "Heliopolis", modern-day "Cairo"). In Dynasty V, the first king, Userkaf, was also Ra's high priest, and he added the term Sa-Ra ("Son of Ra") to the titulary of the pharaohs.

Ra was father of Shu and Tefnut, grandfather of Nut and Geb, great-grandfather of Osiris, Set, Isis, and Nephthys, and great-great-grandfather to Horus. In later periods (about Dynasty 18 on) Osiris and Isis superceded him in popularity, but he remained Ra netjer-aa neb-pet ("Ra, the great God, Lord of Heaven") whether worshiped in his own right or, in later times, as one aspect of the Lord of the Universe, Amen-Ra.

See also Amen-Ra, Horus.
Ra-Horakhty (Ra-Hoor-Khuit)
"Ra, who is Horus of the Horizons." An appelation of Ra, identifying him with Horus, showing the two as manifestations of the singular Solar Force. The spelling "Ra-Hoor-Khuit" was popularized by Aleister Crowley, first in the Book of the Law (Liber AL vel Legis).
See also Horus, Ra.

 

 

Rewritten and reformatted from the original "Frequently Asked Questions and Information about Egyptian Mythology", 8 May 1994 revision, by Shawn C. Knight.
This document is copyright 1995 by Shawn C. Knight. Reproduction in any form, electronic or otherwise, for profit without the consent of the author is expressly prohibited. Readers are free to quote from this document, with attributions, as reference material for research papers, USENET posts, etc.




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